Effects Of Combine Application Of Composted Rice Straw And Inorganic Fertilizer On Soil Health And Tomatoes Yield

DOWNLOAD THE COMPLETE PROJECT»

Effects Of Combine Application Of Composted Rice Straw And Inorganic Fertilizer On Soil Health And Tomatoes Yield

Download This Complete Project Topic And Material (Chapter 1-5 With References and Questionnaire) Titled Effects Of Combine Application Of Composted Rice Straw And Inorganic Fertilizer On Soil Health And Tomatoes Yield. Here On ProjectGate. See Below For The Abstract, Table Of Contents, List Of Figures, List Of Tables, List Of Appendices, List Of Abbreviations, And Chapter One. Click The Download Now Button Below To Get The Complete Project Work Instantly.

PROJECT TOPIC AND MATERIAL ON EFFECTS OF COMBINE APPLICATION OF COMPOSTED RICE STRAW AND INORGANIC FERTILIZER ON SOIL HEALTH AND TOMATOES YIELD

The Project File Details                      

  • Name: Effects Of Combine Application Of Composted Rice Straw And Inorganic Fertilizer On Soil Health And Tomatoes Yield
  • Type: PDF and MS Word (DOC)
  • Size: [70 KB]
  • Length: [56] Pages

 

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background Information

Too much overuse of inorganic fertilizer has led to low soil pH which reduces the availability of essential nutrients to the plants (Mokaya 2016, Singh et al., 2015; Cheng-Wei Liu et al., 2014). This results in low rates of decomposition of organic matter. It also leads to depletion of micronutrients leading to the production of food of low quality nutritionally (Rashid et al., 2016; Brar et al., 2015). Unless the problem is addressed, the soil will eventually become unproductive. The organic matter is a necessity to increase buffering capacity of the soil and also releases nutrients to the plant. The soil pH is increased by liming, which is an expensive exercise and does not add fertility to the soil. There is a need for an alternative method to the application of inorganic fertilizers and liming materials.

The increased human population has not only increased overuse of the land but also has resulted in low yields leading to encroachment of forest cover, which, in turn, leads to reduced rainfall (Liu et al., 2017; Kitula et al., 2015). Therefore, there is need to look for an alternative to inorganic fertilizers that can also increase the forest cover.

The application of mineral fertilizers alone in rehabilitating degraded soils have yielded limited success in farming even when they are available and affordable to farmers (Schröder et al., 2018; Goulding et al., 2016). Organic nitrogen and phosphorus owing to their biogenic origin (Kiyoshi et al., 2017; Kopytko et al., 2017) have the virtue of being released slowly and steadily (Kopytko et al., 2017) to meet the nitrogen demand of crops at all stages of growth. This is opposed to nitrogen in soluble mineral fertilizers is released rather fast and that a part of it may be lost through leaching especially if the rate of release transcends plant uptake. Duong (2013) and Masunga et al. (2015) noted that composts made from organic wastes supply plant nutrients in a slow pattern. When applied in farms, they increase soil organic matter and slowly release organic nutrients as well as preventing luxury consumption (Bley et al., 2017). While examining the suitability of corn-cob compost on plants in acid red soil, Mutezo (2013) reported that composts are suitable in mitigating adverse effects that result harvest loss due to acidity. Successful application of organic manures has prompted more research to be conducted in order to come up with the organic nutrient sources to supplement or even be superior the expensive mineral fertilizer formulations used in crop production. This study therefore wants to investigate the effect of a combination of inorganic fertilizers and organic manure (composted rice straw) on soil health and tomato yield.

GET THE COMPLETE PROJECT»

HIRE A WRITER IF YOU CAN NOT FIND YOUR TOPIC»

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*