Household Determinants Of The Adoption Of Improved Cassava Varieties Using Dna Fingerprinting To Identify Varieties In Farmer Fields: A Case Study In Colombia

DOWNLOAD THE COMPLETE PROJECT»

Household Determinants Of The Adoption Of Improved Cassava Varieties Using Dna Fingerprinting To Identify Varieties In Farmer Fields A Case Study In Colombia

Download This Complete Project Topic And Material (Chapter 1-5 With References and Questionnaire) Titled Household Determinants Of The Adoption Of Improved Cassava Varieties Using Dna Fingerprinting To Identify Varieties In Farmer Fields: A Case Study In Colombia. Here On ProjectGate. See Below For The Abstract, Table Of Contents, List Of Figures, List Of Tables, List Of Appendices, List Of Abbreviations, And Chapter One. Click The Download Now Button Below To Get The Complete Project Work Instantly.

PROJECT TOPIC AND MATERIAL ON HOUSEHOLD DETERMINANTS OF THE ADOPTION OF IMPROVED CASSAVA VARIETIES USING DNA FINGERPRINTING TO IDENTIFY VARIETIES IN FARMER FIELDS: A CASE STUDY IN COLOMBIA

The Project File Details

  • Name: Household Determinants Of The Adoption Of Improved Cassava Varieties Using Dna Fingerprinting To Identify Varieties In Farmer Fields: A Case Study In Colombia
  • Type: PDF and MS Word (DOC)
  • Size: [70 KB]
  • Length: [56] Pages

 

 

Introduction

Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a key crop in tropical countries because it can be cultivated in marginal conditions, with principal traits including: tolerance to low or unpredictable rainfall; cultivability in acidic or nutrient‐deficient soils; easy and low‐cost propagation; ability to be grown all‐year round (Henry and Hershey, 2002; Howeler et al., 2013). In Colombia, smallholders have traditionally grown cassava but high demand for cassava starch has increased the number of large plantation style farmers. However, nearly all the pests and diseases known to affect cassava are present in the country (Henry and Hershey, 2002) making the adoption and studies on the adoption of improved varieties (IVs)1 critical.

Up to now, nearly all studies on the factors affecting adoption of IVs have relied on farmers’ self‐reported cultivar names to estimate varietal adoption (Labarta et al., 2015). Despite efforts by recent studies to engage crop experts with photographs and morphological descriptors, many studies have encountered difficulty in verifying crop varieties cultivated by farmers (Larochelle et al., 2015; Walker, 2015). These difficulties are particularly acute in cassava, which is exclusively maintained by vegetative propagation (stem cuts or in vitro culture). Vegetative propagation allows easy exchange of planting materials among farmers, but maintaining the full genetic integrity of these materials is challenging as farmers do not use uniform naming conventions or uniform cultivar arrangements on their farms.

In recent years, the incorporation of DNA fingerprinting in agricultural economic studies has been proposed to resolve IV identification issues. We use DNA fingerprinting and econometric analysis to compare the determinants of adoption of improved cassava varieties between farmer self‐reported identification and identification by geneticists in the Cauca department of Colombia.

GET THE COMPLETE PROJECT»

HIRE A WRITER IF YOU CAN NOT FIND YOUR TOPIC»

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*